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Zen Humanism

Zen Humanism - Humanity is the Measure of all things.

A Daybook for Deists, Theists, Atheists and Buddhists, oh my! Welcome to the religious, irreligious and free thinkers of every variety.
Sep 19 '11

Healing Anger: The Power of Patience from a Buddhist Perspective

There is a Buddhist practice in which one imagines giving joy and the source of all joy to other people, thereby removing all their suffering. Though of course we cannot change their situation, I do feel that in some cases, through a genuine sense of caring and compassion, through our sharing in their plight, our attitude can help alleviate their suffering, if only mentally. However, the main point of this practice is to increase our inner strength and courage.


I have chosen a few lines that I feel would be acceptable to people of all faiths, and even to those with no spiritual belief. When reading these lines, if you are a religious practitioner, you can reflect upon the divine form that you worship. Then, while reciting these verses, make the commitment to enhance your spiritual values. If you are not religious, you can reflect upon the fact that, fundamentally, all beings are equal to you in their wish for happiness and their desire to overcome suffering. Recognizing this, you make a pledge to develop a good heart. It is most important that we have a warm heart. As long as we are part of human society, it is very important to be a kind, warm-hearted person.


May the poor find wealth,
Those weak with sorrow find joy.
May the forlorn find new hope,
Constant happiness and prosperity.

May the frightened cease to be afraid,
And those bound be free.
May the weak find power,
And may their hearts join in friendship.
from An Open Heart: Practicing Compassion in Everyday Life

Patiently accepting small hardships gives one the opportunity to apply other practices. One could make aspirational prayers and the dedication, “By my experience of this suffering, may I be able to purify my negativities committed in the past.” One can also use the opportunity for the practice of tong-len, which is the Mahayana practice of “giving and taking.”


…This advice is especially useful when dealing with illnesses. Of course it is important, first of all, to take all the preventative measures so one does not suffer from illnesses, such as adopting the right diet, or whatever it may be. Then when one becomes ill, it is important not to overlook the necessity for taking the appropriate medications and other measures necessary for healing. However, there would be an important difference in how one responded to illness if instead of moaning about the situation, instead of feeling sorry for oneself, instead of being overwhelmed by anxiety and worry, one saved oneself from these unnecessary additional mental pains and suffering by adopting the right attitude.

Although it may not succeed in alleviating the real physical pain and suffering, one can think, “May I, by experiencing this pain and suffering, be able to help other people and save others who may have to go through the same experience.” One can in this way use that opportunity for a spiritual practice, in other words, practicing tong-len meditation, or “giving and taking.”

This type of practice, although it might not necessarily lead to a real cure in physical terms, can definitely protect one from unnecessary additional mental suffering and pain. And on top of that, it is also possible that instead of being saddened by the experience one can see it as a kind of privilege. One can see it as an opportunity and in fact be joyful because of this particular experience which has made one’s life richer.

(Source: snowlionpub.com)

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